New Wave Audio Theatre Season Two

New Wave Audio Theatre is a fairly new podcast developed by Connor Reidy (Director), Anita Sanders (Project Manager), Leah McKeown (Sound Engineer), and Aden Beaver (Graphic Designer). Having just concluded its second season, New Wave has three half hour sessions each made up of three separate audio-theatre pieces written by local authors.

Season Two: Episode One, Places, consistes of three short audio-theatre pieces by Jamie Hornsby, Simon-Peter Telford, and Taeghan Buggy. Each deal with the anxieties of three very different situations as well as addressing important issues such as murder, suicide, and drug use.

It is important to note that the issues that these pieces deal with can be hard hitting with the team providing contact details for support services such as Beyond Blue: 1300 22 46 36 and Lifeline: 13 11 14.

 
Marree

Written by Jamie Hornsby

Performed by Hannah Helbig

Marree is a deceptive story about a young woman looking for a lift to Adelaide. Hitch-hiking, she is hesitant to get in with a strange man, but with seemingly no choice she acquiesces. Hornsby’s writing paired with Helbig’s acting perfectly captures the anxiety of being in cars with strange men—particularly when you know about Wolf Creek. Too busy sympathising with the main character, the beautiful twist caught me by surprise.

Extremely intelligent and motivated, Hornbury’s character is the kind of resourceful person we all aspire to be.

 

Hush

Written by Simon-Peter Telford

Performed by John Khammash

A man is driving down the highway with his baby on the way to a fresh start. He blames himself for his wife’s death and worries that his words and actions will harm their child as he grows up. They stop in at a pub for a meal and the man considers his options. How can he ensure that he will do what’s right for the baby? What is right for the baby? The man knows that the boy deserves to have a whole, loving family. But what can he do now that the mother is dead?

This is a very full-on story to listen to as the man ruminates on his decisions, allowing his anxiety to take over.

 

Last Ride

Written by Taeghan Buggy

Performed by Max Kowalick

Last Ride follows a man seeking revenge on the man who got him into drugs when he was fifteen years old. He has a devastating plan because while “[he] is an idiot, [he] is not dumb”. As the piece goes on you learn the lengths he has gone to not just to entrap his boss but ensure that whether the boss dies or not, he is caught by the authorities. The narrator feels as if he is trapped and as if his involvement with the drug dealer has ruined his life to the point where at the age of twenty he has no other option but to seek revenge.

 

 

You can listen to New Wave Audio Theatre Season One and Two on their website: https://newwaveaudiotheatre.com/.

 

Alternately both seasons are available for download from iTunes, Soundcloud, or Whoshkaa.

 


Words by Kayla Gaskell.

Feature image from https://newwaveaudiotheatre.com/.

New Wave Audio Theatre Episode One: Between

New Wave is a podcast series in which writers and actors work together to present the listener with three unique pieces of audio theatre. This is an excellent opportunity for Adelaide creatives to share their talents and also for people from all walks of life to indulge in theatre performance, despite not having the time or money to get to a physical theatre.

Episode One: Beyond, presents the audience with three short plays. Alys Messenger’s Hurt Money, Taeghan Buggy’s Stateline’s, and Anita Sanders Limbo. Working together with director Connor Reidy and actors Cat Galligani, David Hampton, Kieran Drost, Nicola O’Farrell, Hannah Hilbig, and Max Kowalick, these plays are performed through voice acting, without compromising the audience experience.

Alys Messenger’s Hurt Money follows the story of Lucia (Cat Galligani) and Anthony’s (David Hampton) sibling conflict in face of their mother’s illness. Lucia and Anthony have been estranged since their father died and Anthony convinced his mother to sell the house and invest in a ‘luxury retirement village for rich wankers on the Gold Coast’. But the investment still hasn’t paid off, and, as Anthony admits, it might not have been such a great idea after all. With his honesty and Lucia’s need for someone to care for and about, it seems like they might just be able to push aside their problems and share a nostalgic meal of dumplings from their favourite restaurant.

Taeghan Buggy’s Stateline’s follows the story of Sarah and Ria who accidently board the same bus to Victoria, old friends who haven’t seen each other in years. But what could have been a simple, innocent conversation turns into both girls spilling their guts and sharing their problems. Sarah is pregnant with Tom’s child. She’s going to Melbourne to get an abortion, against Tom’s wishes. In doing so she’s risking Tom’s wrath—but how can she keep a baby when he’s too afraid to commit to their relationship? Ria’s life isn’t going much better. She’s headed to Geelong to attend her great uncle’s funeral, but this uncle is the one who outed her to the entire family, causing her estrangement and the shunning of her girlfriend, Kate. Going against Kate’s wishes, Ria is ‘swimming back to her homophobic family’, desperately wanting to give them a chance. The girls use the bus trip to offer each other much needed support and encouragement to do what they think is right.

Anita Sanders’ Limbo follows a male and female character who are stuck in limbo and discussing their future potential—limbo being one of the only places they can stand in one place. The man questions why people must be perpetually moving forward while the woman, who has recently arrived, questions the bus to the future. They are both nostalgic for the past and resent their pre-planned futures, relishing the opportunity to stand still instead of perpetually moving forward— ‘Every decision was made in a hurry, hoping for a future that would be brighter than the past’. The future is a fog, a mystery waiting to be uncovered, yet unless they embrace the future they will be consumed by the dark—the dark which has already claimed Sammy. The piece shows the importance of moving forward and maintaining connections and relationships.

All three of these pieces allow the audience to enjoy, dissect, and consider the messages presented. The audio effects used serve only to enhance the audience experience while the pieces themselves call for a reflection on the various relationships that exist and are maintained throughout our lives. I would highly recommend this free audio theatre experience as a way to embrace theatre and support locally produced art. I look forward to hearing the second instalment, Algorithm, which is due to be released on December 7.


Words by Kayla Gaskell

See more from New Wave Audio Theatre at: https://newwaveaudiotheatre.com/