In Conversation: New Wave Audio Theatre (series two)

After New Wave’s successful first series last year, the team has come back together to formulate a second series. Before New Wave’s initial series, Tulpa Magazine sat down with the creatives behind it. This year’s series has begun and Tulpa once again caught up with New Wave’s Anita Sanders to discuss what’s changed, what’s stayed the same, and what went in to a second series.

 

How did you find the experience of the first series?
The first season was an excellent experience; over the creation process there was a strong sense of focussed energy and hope. Often scripts that are made for performance will go through a dramaturgical and workshop process to make them performance-ready. However, that script will then often miss being performed for a long time or at all. The first season and the second have had a clear journey to becoming a tangible experience for audiences from the start. I think it’s really brought out the best in our creatives.

How did the experiences of the first series shape how you approached the second?
A moment in season one that defined the second season was when I was sitting in the recording sessions and realised how strong our actors were. They demonstrated such skill in transforming and layering the characters they played. It made me think about how they would all thrive with a monologue because they’d have more time and material to showcase their skills within. That realisation set New Wave: Audio Theatre’s second season on the path to monologues instead of short plays.

What has changed in your approach, and in the result?
Since we, Connor (our director) and I decided to create a season of monologues, we wanted to ensure that the monologues that our writers created would align with our actors. We shifted the start of the creation process from a writers exclusive space to one that welcomed the actor and writers to connect with each other. This generated room for the writers to share story ideas and then have an actor add on their thoughts. I feel starting the process this way led to scripts that were theatrically rich and supported the actors’ methods.

Where do you see the series going from here?
We’re yet to start putting our minds to the next steps. Our focus will always be on generating opportunities for creatives to engage with each other and make great art.

You have some new personnel working on the second series – how much has this influenced the results?
In the first season we were a fairly small team that included three writers, six actors and a director. For the second season, the team has been expanded to twenty creatives: nine writers, nine actors, an audio engineer and a director. This means that there is one actor and one writer to every monologue in the season. It’s made more time for the writers and actors to explore what they are creating and thus develop work that pushes the boundaries of storytelling and the radio form. Having an audio engineer, Leah McKeown, has been a gift to the season. She’s given the audio a polished edge that we weren’t able to achieve before, which enhances the clarity of the performances.

What do you want the audience to get out of this? (and has the intended experience changed since last series)
Firstly, to just enjoy the experience and be entertained! And I hope the cream is that audiences discover a little slice of radio magic whilst being challenged by up-and-coming South Australian talent.

Why did you choose the stories you have chosen?
Unlike the traditional radio play production process, we don’t wait for scripts to be submitted to us. The whole process from writing the story to recording all happens in-house. So we haven’t really chosen the stories, we made a space for new stories to grow.
The most fascinating thing is through this process we have accidentally uncovered a kind of collective consciousness. Over the season, many stories return to similar ideas on mental health, women’s place in society and old decisions coming back to haunt you. So the season reflects some concerns and interests that are top of the mind, whilst offering a new window to see them through.

 


New Wave Audio Theatre can be found on Facebook here.

New Wave Audio Theatre Season Two

New Wave Audio Theatre is a fairly new podcast developed by Connor Reidy (Director), Anita Sanders (Project Manager), Leah McKeown (Sound Engineer), and Aden Beaver (Graphic Designer). Having just concluded its second season, New Wave has three half hour sessions each made up of three separate audio-theatre pieces written by local authors.

Season Two: Episode One, Places, consistes of three short audio-theatre pieces by Jamie Hornsby, Simon-Peter Telford, and Taeghan Buggy. Each deal with the anxieties of three very different situations as well as addressing important issues such as murder, suicide, and drug use.

It is important to note that the issues that these pieces deal with can be hard hitting with the team providing contact details for support services such as Beyond Blue: 1300 22 46 36 and Lifeline: 13 11 14.

 
Marree

Written by Jamie Hornsby

Performed by Hannah Helbig

Marree is a deceptive story about a young woman looking for a lift to Adelaide. Hitch-hiking, she is hesitant to get in with a strange man, but with seemingly no choice she acquiesces. Hornsby’s writing paired with Helbig’s acting perfectly captures the anxiety of being in cars with strange men—particularly when you know about Wolf Creek. Too busy sympathising with the main character, the beautiful twist caught me by surprise.

Extremely intelligent and motivated, Hornbury’s character is the kind of resourceful person we all aspire to be.

 

Hush

Written by Simon-Peter Telford

Performed by John Khammash

A man is driving down the highway with his baby on the way to a fresh start. He blames himself for his wife’s death and worries that his words and actions will harm their child as he grows up. They stop in at a pub for a meal and the man considers his options. How can he ensure that he will do what’s right for the baby? What is right for the baby? The man knows that the boy deserves to have a whole, loving family. But what can he do now that the mother is dead?

This is a very full-on story to listen to as the man ruminates on his decisions, allowing his anxiety to take over.

 

Last Ride

Written by Taeghan Buggy

Performed by Max Kowalick

Last Ride follows a man seeking revenge on the man who got him into drugs when he was fifteen years old. He has a devastating plan because while “[he] is an idiot, [he] is not dumb”. As the piece goes on you learn the lengths he has gone to not just to entrap his boss but ensure that whether the boss dies or not, he is caught by the authorities. The narrator feels as if he is trapped and as if his involvement with the drug dealer has ruined his life to the point where at the age of twenty he has no other option but to seek revenge.

 

 

You can listen to New Wave Audio Theatre Season One and Two on their website: https://newwaveaudiotheatre.com/.

 

Alternately both seasons are available for download from iTunes, Soundcloud, or Whoshkaa.

 


Words by Kayla Gaskell.

Feature image from https://newwaveaudiotheatre.com/.

Deviant Women: Julie D’Aubigny

The life of Julie D’Aubigny – swashbuckling, nun-burning, opera-singing, famously bisexual fencing connoisseur – is extraordinary to say the least and deserves a retelling of equal splendour. I am delighted to write that last night at the Jade, this was achieved with achievement to spare.

Lauren and Alicia, creators of the Deviant Women podcast, seek to uncover and celebrate historical women whose exploits have quite literally stuck it to the man. In a self-coined “multi-modal” experience, which included costumes, live fencing, comic re-enactments, and some delightful claymation, they retold the legend of Julie’s orphan upbringing in 17th century France. With comedic flair and passion, they followed Julie through her numerous duels, her disguises, her singing career, her death warrant, and her impressive list of lovers, both men and women.

Adding visuals to Deviant Women’s usual podcast format enhanced the charm and intelligence that, to their great credit, has always been present in their recorded episodes. With flamboyant colour, video and physical comedy, they traced Julie’s adventures through Paris, Spain, and the Spanish Netherlands, all the way to her grief-ridden fall into obscurity, and her death in her mid-thirties.

As they discussed in an earlier interview with Tulpa, Lauren and Alicia are both academics, and are curious about the ways that historical women subvert and redefine archetypes of femininity and monstrosity. Their comedy is thus underpinned by socio-political commentary, which last night questioned why it is so deviant for a woman to take a female lover, or to display physical strength. Whilst framed by comedy, these concerns are still alarmingly relevant to our contemporary lives, in the aftermath of marriage equality, and in conversations surrounding toxic masculinity.

In short: it was the sort of comedy that gives one delight and then gives one pause, in the best way possible.

The word “delightful” has been used several times throughout this review. This is only because, by the end, it was the only word that fit the experience, and in chatting with other audience members it became clear that the feeling was unanimous. ‘Delightful!’ several of my friends exclaimed, still laughing. ‘That’s exactly the right word!’

Deviant Women’s second and final show, which explores the mysterious Madame Blavatsky and the spookiness of the Victorian seance, will be performed at the Jade on Wednesday, March 14th. You can also find their podcast here.

 


Words by Jess M. Miller

Five stars.

Tickets available for Deviant Women: Madame Blavatsky here.

The Guilty Feminist Podcast

The Guilty Feminist Podcast at the Adelaide Fringe festival was, sadly, a one-off for this Fringe season. But host, Deborah Frances-White, is headed to Melbourne next, and after being introduced to the podcast tonight for the first time, I’d already say with absolute resoluteness – YOU MUST CHECK THIS PODCAST OUT. The Guilty Feminist Podcast has received over 25 million downloads in just two years, and the production is dubbed by Frances-White as ‘radio they can’t stop you making.’

 

Hosted by Deborah Frances-White with guest hosts Claire Hooper (Great Australian Bake-Off, Good News Week) and Tessa Waters, on Saturday night they tackled the tricky subject of feminism and money. With plenty of comedy that left the full house at the Royal Theatre laughing and whooping, these women engaged in a show likened to a ‘really comfortable women’s march with jokes’ and also wine.

 

While keeping everyone entertained and cheering with a game called, ‘I’m a Feminist, but…’, Hooper and France-White took jabs at the comparable level of complexity to the inner workings of spark plugs and hair ties, or at the customs officer who likened a feminist podcast to women’s football. All three women also had real moments of sincerity, highlighting the importance of women taking control of their finances as a step towards gender equality. Hooper informed us that the average retired woman will have a little over half the money that the average retired man will have, and Waters addressed the difficulty women have in negotiating their pay, particularly in the Arts. To discuss such heavy topics and still manage to throw in jokes about flaps and threesomes, takes skill and left me very impressed. Frances-White said at the opening of the show, ‘Well-behaved women never make history’, a sentiment that perfectly encapsulates The Guilty Feminist Podcast.

 


Words by Kirsty van der Veer

Four stars.

You can listen to The Guilty Feminist Podcast here, and if you’re able, the podcast will be live in Melbourne at The Coopers Malthouse on February 28th and 1st and 2nd March.

In Conversation With: Deviant Women

 

After a successful first season of their podcast, Deviant Women creators Alicia Carter and Lauren Butterworth are taking to the stage to bring you the wild and wonderful stories of two historical women– Julie D’Aubigny and Madame Blavatsky. In the lead-up to their first show, Tulpa sat down with Deviant Women to talk podcasts, dressing up and what they have in store for fans this year.

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How did Deviant Women (the podcast) start out and what inspired you to start it?

LB: Both of us are doing PhDs in this kind of general area so our research interests intersect in this kind of area of Deviant women, but also issues of representations of femininity, feminist revisionism, female archetypes, monstrous women. So, we’ve talked about this for years. We’ve spent many, many hours just talking about this stuff because we both really love it. I’m a podcast fan, [Alicia is] not, she actually doesn’t listen to podcasts.

AC: It’s terrible because there’s nothing else I would do without engaging with the actual thing. I don’t write stories and not read stories… I don’t try to write novels about reading novels. And yet, I podcast, without listening to podcasts.

LB: So I was the podcast fan, and basically I listen to a lot of podcasts that are by women and have very conversational female banter about serious subject matter but very casual, conversational, funny way. Really I was like, this sounds like a conversation Alicia and I would have– we could probably do this. I think one day in Gresham place we were standing outside of a bar and I was like, ‘Do you want to do a podcast about deviant women?’ and [Alicia] was just like, ‘Alright, I’ll text you about it’, and she did. She sent me a text with a bunch of women she’d thought of and I was like, ‘Oh shit, we’re doing this– cool.’

AC: I was like, ‘I’m along for the ride, as long as I don’t have to do any of the technical stuff.’

 

What were some of the issues and setbacks you had to face in setting up the podcast in order for it to have a life of its own?

AC: Well it’s easy to start it, but then to have it take on a life of its own… that’s the hard thing.

LB: There were little things, like getting a microphone. My boyfriend is a musician and a sound engineer, so he had microphones but they weren’t the right type of microphone for recording voices. So we had to get over the initial hurdle of ‘we have to get a microphone; we need a website to host the sound files on’. We had to do a little research about what are the best podcasting hosts.

AC: How do we get on to iTunes? How do we even do that?

LB: There was just a lot of Googling and learning by figuring stuff out, but we’re learning that kind of stuff constantly. That was probably the biggest learning hurdle- what are the practical things that we need to do to launch, to have a website? Luckily, we used a lot of people that we know.

AC: Yeah, a friend of mine is an art director and she did a logo for us, which was great. Our logo is such a simple idea, but it was just so perfect. All she’s done is turn [the name] upside down. But that’s the whole point. We were really lucky with how quickly that all fell into place.

LB: India is one of my oldest friends and she’s a musician and I was like, ‘We’re thinking of doing this podcast about deviant women, do you think you could make us a theme song?’ She came back a week later [and said], ‘I’ve recorded this thing. See what you think.’ Then we had to get a fan-base, and that’s been the hurdle that continues, but also, I think is one that I find a really fun challenge.

AC: You say it was a hurdle, and it definitely has been. I mean, that is the big thing: are people listening to us? Are we just shouting into the void, or what is going on? But to be completely honest, we were absolutely blown away with how many people were listening to us. And where they were listening to us from. When we started we were like, we’ll see where this goes, but oh my god, people were listening. They were leaving reviews and they were contacting us and interacting with us on Twitter. People actually care– there are people out there who are actually interested in what we’re doing.

LB: It kind of feels like we’ve broken away from the pack in terms of the really small podcasts. We might be able to graduate into the next level. We’re hoping this year we’ll crack the next level.

AC: This podcast has really been about empowering women. But [a hard part] is actually gaining the confidence to actually say ‘Oh you know, what we’re doing is actually something of worth.’ This is the whole thing with the deviant women that we talk about– as women we constantly have this reinforcement that what we do isn’t valued as much as what other people do; as what privileged white men do.

LB: This is the biggest hurdle for both of us. I mean, I would love to have more guests and have guests who are personalities in the world that people know. We’ve not ever really approached anyone – everyone we’ve had as a guest has approached us. So this year one of our biggest goals is to overcome that hurdle of having the confidence to realise our podcast is something that people like, is legitimate, and we can approach whoever– because the worst they can say is no.

AC: As naff as it sounds: the biggest hurdle is believing in ourselves.

 

Do you think your background as PhD students – doing a lot of research, doing a lot of study- has influenced the way you approach this podcast?

LB: I mean, I always look for peer-reviewed journals. Academic texts about the women we talk about.

AC: I remember my sister once said to me ‘Do you just read the Wikipedia entries?’ and I was like, ‘No! We’re researchers!’ We may look at the Wikipedia entry, but that’s not the end in what we research. That kind of need, as academic researchers, to know that the information that we’re finding is peer reviewed, is legitimate. Sometimes the information that we find is conflicting, there are a lot of holes, there are a lot of things that we don’t know, but I think that definitely that background as PhD students and researchers feeds into how we approach researching these women.

LB: And also particularly because we want our podcast to have a focus not only on the women’s biographies, but is also thinking about the social contexts and the way that particularly patriarchal structures play into the way that the women that we highlight engage in the world.

AC: I think that really what we do with the podcast itself is: here is a really interesting story about a really interesting person– take all of our information with a grain of salt.

 

Are you doing season two of the Deviant Women podcast this year? 

AC: Yes, season two will begin on March 22nd.

LB: But there’s probably going to be a bonus episode or two before then. Some inter-seasonal specials. We have an enormous and ever-growing list of women we want to cover, so the challenge is going to be choosing which women to cover in this season and which will have to wait for next time. Honestly though, I would really like to know what our listeners want from us. We’ve had a very history-focused first season and we would like to know- is this what you like? Do you want more of this in season two? Do we throw in more mythology? More literature? What do people want to hear? Because we’re interested in all of it.

 

yagals
Deviant Women creators Alicia Carter and Lauren Butterworth

What made you want to do a stage show of Deviant Women?

AC: Oh my god, do you know what it was? Lauren and I love dress-ups– if someone has a dress-up party we’re like ‘That’s the best news, when is it? Is it in three months?’ I’ll spend the next three months planning my outfit. No worries, we do love dressing up. And I remember saying to Lauren, ‘If only there was some way we could have an excuse to dress up as some of these women from history’, and then we just looked at each other and were like, ‘We should have a live show!’

So, legitimately, what drove our passion to have this live show was wanting to dress up. That is actually what sparked the idea. It’s not what’s still driving the idea– there is some substance to the shows as well, but what started up the idea was that conversation.

LB: This is not the podcast live, this is Deviant Women: the stage show. There’s a lot of podcasts that have live recordings in front of an audience, but it’s not just going to be Alicia and I sitting on two chairs with microphones telling the stories in the same way we would if we were just recording at home. It is a stage version of Deviant Women, so it’s a different product that’s come from the same place, but it’s like the podcast is one part of Deviant Women and it kind of feels like the stage shows are another element. So, we’ll see how that goes.

 

How did you go about adapting Deviant Women for the stage?

AC: To begin with we actually just thought what we’ll do is we’ll sit down and we’ll record it like we would for a normal podcast. So we did what we normally do– we both decide who will take the lead on each woman. Lauren has a wealth of specialty knowledge in Victoriana, séances, the occult, etc. So it just seemed natural that Lauren would take the lead on Blavatsky, because otherwise I would be re-researching a whole bunch of stuff she already knew. So then D’Aubigny fell to me, which I was perfectly happy with. We just went about researching them separately, doing what we would normally do for an episode, and then we basically just sat down and tried to record it in a similar sort of way that we would for a podcast. From that [we] listened back to find where the really interesting parts lay. What had dramatic appeal, what we could really do something with onstage. That’s not to say that in the stage shows we don’t alter their lives. I mean, it is a fictionalised version.

LB: Well, not a fictional version. It’s a version that based on things that have become legend. It’s more like, this is the legend and these are the stories that are told about them. We can’t verify 100% that they’re true.

AC: Yeah, so listening back to those podcasts we really picked out those moments that were the most sort of interesting, that kind of deconstructed how these women functioned in their societies as well. It is different to the podcast in the fact that we are focusing more on particular parts of their lives rather than giving the entire birth to death, but kind of focusing on the really key moments of interest in their lives.

LB: Pivotal things that make them who they are or show them as being these incredible, ridiculous characters.

AC: So we kind of picked out those moments and asked, where can we go from here? How can we make these moments performative? How can we make these moments dramatic and interesting?

LB: It’s all a work in progress. Even when we perform it, it’ll be probably still a work in progress.

AC: We’re following the chronology in these women’s lives, and there’s going to be some acting– some fabulous acting, oh my god– Oscar award-winning acting will be happening, but it’s not going to be scripted down to letter, you know? It’ll still have that free-flow feeling. And that’s the free-form style of the podcasts themselves.

LB: We have a script, but we might not follow it.

 

What do you think your audience is going to get out of these shows?

LB: I feel part of the problem we’ve had with this show is not knowing how to categorise it. We’re not quite theatre, we hope that we’re funny but we’re not stand-up comedians. We’re not just a normal event. We’re not strictly storytelling, what are we? So I hope that what audiences get is something that doesn’t fit anywhere, but is different and interesting, entertaining but also informative and maybe gets them a little bit fired up about these women and makes them want to learn a bit more about some people who are also like this, and maybe get them to tune into the podcast.

AC: Yeah, that’s true. But also, I think that it gets them to go away from it and be like, the next person they see being like, ‘Hey, did you know this woman existed? Did you know there was this outrageous woman in 17th century France who was this bisexual swords-woman, opera singer…’

LB: [D’Aubigny] took on literally packs of men at a time. She fought three or four of them at a time.

AC: [For Blavatsky] we’re more the parlour style [séance], it’ll be more like a re-creation. I don’t know that we’ll be calling up any actual spirits.

LB: We hope that’s fun.

AC: It is going to be fun but I think the thing that we really look for with these two [women] is contrasts. Obviously that’s the aesthetic we’re going for with the posters. You look at the D’Aubigny one, it’s pink, it’s flowery, it’s a kind of light hearted, flamboyant story. And then Blavatsky is taking us to that other place. It’s taking us to that dark, mysterious place. So they’re going to be very different shows, both just as entertaining as each other but in very different ways.

LB: Which is why you should see both. We hope the show is fun. We hope that it’s very casual, tongue-in-cheek and we just hope it’s a good time.

 


 

Deviant Women will be performing at the Adelaide Fringe on the 26th of February and the 14th of March. You can grab your tickets here. You can learn more about Deviant Women and their podcast on their website, or listen on iTunes. You can find them on Facebook and Twitter.

 

Tulpa thanks Deviant Women creators Alicia Carter and Lauren Butterworth for taking the time to speak with us. Interview conducted and transcribed by Lisandra Linde.

 

In Conversation With: New Wave Audio Theatre

Tulpa Magazine  recently sat down with the cast and crew of the New Wave Audio Theatre to discuss their forthcoming full-cast audio plays. This new venture is headlined by a talented group of young creatives seeking to bring the products of the arts community to more people and show the works of unheralded artists. We were joined by writers Taeghan Buggy and Alys Messenger, actors Cat Galligani and David Hampton, director Connor Reidy, and project manager Anita Sanders.

What the New Wave Audio Theatre team have produced is characterised by their collaborative nature. The impression one has when sitting down with this team is one of cohesion and mutual pride in their work.

new wave

Pictured (Left to right): Taeghan Buggy, Alys Messenger, Cat Galligani, David Hampton, Connor Reidy, and Anita Sanders.

The first thing we asked them is why they chose podcasts as their medium of choice. Anita explained that the dual benefits inherent to this format are the cost-effective nature of production and the ability for a podcast to transcend your surroundings. With the ability to put in your headphones and listen wherever you might be, the convenience of the format is greater than most. Anita also offered her view on the effect audio has on an actor’s performance as the actor cannot use gestures or hide behind costumes – they must ensure all their effort is put towards the use of their voice.

Actor David Hampton explained that learning to focus his performance through his voice, when he is used to working with posture, positioning, costume, and action, was an interesting experience. He recalls director Connor Reidy approaching him at an early recording to tell him ‘I can see you acting it but I can’t hear you acting it’. He had to shift his mindset from how he was previously taught to act.

The accessibility of the format is an important part of New Wave. It has none of the demands or barriers of more traditional theatre such as cost and set times. With a podcast, the theatre comes to you. It enables the listener to access emerging artists’ work without the investment of an entire evening. This not only benefits the artists involved but also the viewer. New Wave brings theatre to all levels of society, including those who have neither time nor money to spare on traditional theatre.

Director Connor Reidy  found working with writers and actors a rewarding experience, enabling him to see what each party sought to achieve. It was unlike anything Connor had done before.

The larger number of people in the workshop environment of the scripting process made for more variety in ideas and had plans go in unexpected directions, writer Taeghan Buggy said. Three or four people would be in a room together working from the initial ideas and themes, teasing out a concept from these beginnings. Alys Messenger recalls that on one occasion, the team created a mind map following the development of ideas, and eventually they ended up in a place they had never expected.

Anita was key in looking for the writers to bring in to the project. Her priorities were in finding writers with a passion for the performing arts as this project was not just about the writing but also the performance itself. Anita chose Taeghan for her interest in poetry, which she felt would translate well to audio plays. Connor recalls the poetic nature of the opening of one play (episode three) and how effective this was.

Connor Reidy was largely responsible for finding actors, knowing more actors and having the more available networks, being in the final degree of a performing arts degree. Actor Cat Galligani explains that she had worked on a project with Connor at the beginning of the year and that he was able to bring three or four actors over from that project.

According to Connor, what they wanted to achieve in pursuing this project was showcasing artists’ voices. Adding that in Adelaide, we are lucky to have quite a large network of creative people but unfortunately there are limited opportunities. This project gives listeners the chance to sample the talent of the Adelaide arts community and reach out and support them. Connor said that while the arts are heavily supported during February and March, it filters off through the rest of the year. New Wave Audio Theatre coming at the end of the year gives them a good opportunity to connect with audiences before they are flooded with mad March.

Taeghan said that from her perspective as a writer, her goals focused more on capturing the attention of the audience by providing something that drew them in and made them want to keep listening.

Writer Alys Messenger, who tends to focus on directing, refocused on writing for this project. With a background in drama, she offers a different perspective again. For her, the goal was to look into the dynamics of relationships, because that’s where she feels a lot of drama lies, in that point of butting heads between two people. Though, she added, not necessarily people, as you’ll find out in one of them.

It’s surely the business of a writer to pique the curiosity of their audience, after all.

From an actor’s perspective, Cat Galligani said that she hopes the plays offer an escape. Whether that be from something going on in the listener’s life, or simply boredom, that wherever they should be, they hear someone else’s problems, someone else’s dynamic, and they get a new experience.

Looking back at their experiences, all expressed having enjoyed their time. Connor said that working in a form that was solely voice was interesting and enabled the development of new skills. Cat’s experiences seem to be similar as she explained she found the focus on voice, and the development of an entire character using just voice, to be a good experience, enabling her to try things she had not previously attempted, such as new accents.

Taeghan found the process very free. The method of telling the story (all audio, a set time) was constrained but within that, there was great freedom in what they could tell. Taeghan said Anita told them she felt their work felt fresh. It is something of a departure from larger theatre where they choose the plays they know to be a success and thus restrict themselves from fresher and younger voices. Getting a younger voice out there in a medium accessible for younger people is a goal one feels is held with universal importance by the New Wave team.

For Alys, the workshop environment and the nature of generating ideas within that was a worthy experience. Harking back to Connor’s comment of limited opportunities, Alys said she feels that it is often necessary to create opportunities, just as they have done with New Wave.

David described the New Wave experience as being akin to a ‘creative pallet-cleanser’ – working with a group almost entirely new to him, he felt he had to rethink approaches to character.

For Cat the scripts she worked on with New Wave were some of the easiest scripts she has performed because of how well they were written. One such script, Hurt Money, by Alys Messenger was one of the first scripts she had picked up and felt certain what her character was about, her background and motivation.

Anita stressed the importance of providing channels of distribution for artists as not enough exist to take the amount of art produced in Adelaide. That by setting about creating and distributing art, they were able to show the ‘amazing talent’ already present in Adelaide that just needed to be seen. They sought to create a positive environment of growth that would enable artists to be acknowledged both in the industry and by the general public.

What of the future? The chorus of approval for more New Wave Audio Theatre is absolute. Everyone expressed a desire to do more should the opportunity arise.


Words by Liam McNally

Photography by Lisandra Linde

With thanks to Anita Sanders, Alys Messenger, Taeghan Buggy, David Hampton, and Cat Galligani.

New Wave Audio Theatre’s first episode is to be released on 30th November. Be sure to check back on Tulpa for the review on Wednesday.

Check New Wave Audio Theatre out at their site: https://newwaveaudiotheatre.wordpress.com/