#MeToo: Stories from the Australian movement

#MeToo: Stories from the Australian movement

Edited by Natalie Kon-yu, Christie Nieman, Maggie Scott and Miriam Sved
Picador Australia


In the wake of the #MeToo movement in 2017, editors Natalie Kon-yu, Christie Nieman, Maggie Scott and Miriam Sved have pulled together a collection of poetry, fiction and essays placing issues of sexual violence and harassment in an Australian context. This incredibly timely and hard-hitting collection is a must-read for Australians of every sex and gender. While many of the personal stories in this anthology can be confronting and visceral in their discussions of sexual harassment and abuse, they serve as a vital testament to the importance of opening up nuanced and often hard-to-have conversations about the issues facing women, non-binary and transgender people in Australia.

One of the things this anthology does best is its ability to bring together works from a diverse range of voices, providing a truly intersectional perspective on sexual violence and harassment in Australia. This includes stories from women of colour, immigrant women, LGBTQIA+ people and women with disabilities. This intersectionality is made all the more important when you consider the often over-bearing whiteness of mainstream feminism. For many women of marginalised backgrounds the ability to speak out, to share a #MeToo story must be weighed up against the risks of financial, social and personal repercussions.

With this in mind, some absolute must-read pieces in this collection are: Eugenia Flynn’s discussion of Aboriginal women and gendered violence, Carly Findlay’s piece on sexual harassment and accountability within disability and activist communities, Rebecca Lim’s ‘#MeToo and the Marginalised’ and Kaya Wilson’s piece about the transgender perspective of gendered violence and  harassment.

Something many of these stories have in common is the complexities involved in speaking out when you belong to a marginalised group. As Eugenia Flynn notes, ‘It is the #MeToo movement not hearing all the times that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women did not speak out, for fear of further stereotyping our men’. Multi-layered identities, in which women belong to multiple groups facing unique issues, make navigating the #MeToo movement much harder.

What the stories in this anthology do is remind us all of the voices left out of movements like #MeToo and the need for all of us to listen to, and support, the women and people whose voices cannot be as readily shared without an awareness and understanding of intersectionality. It’s for this reason that this book is so vital, and why I recommend it to all adult readers. We all have a lot to learn about one another and about gendered violence and harassment. This book is an important step forward for these discussions.

 

5/5 stars

#MeToo is available to purchase here and through any good book store.


Words by Lisandra Linde

Greek Comedian of the Year

Greek Comedian of the Year, presented at the Howling Owl, Griffins Hotel and the Austral, was one of the most enjoyable and engaging pieces of comedy at the Fringe this season I’ve seen. George Zacharopoulos, the self-titled “Greek Comedian of the Year”, stood before audiences night after night sharing stories from his upbringing in Kalamata, Greece, and his experiences living in the UK for the last fifteen years. This show had everything from embarrassing childhood stories to circumcision, dating with children, and cultural conflicts.

The way Zacharopoulos’ conversed with audience was charming and effortless, enhancing every aspect of his material; he made sure to identify the Greeks in the room, and those of other cultures – Lebanese, Italians and Vietnamese at the show I attended. For those without an ethnic background, this show will give you a hilarious and honest insight into the quirks of Greek culture. For those with any form of ethnic background, this show will ring home loud and true, and you will find yourself relating to our charismatic comedian from the get-go. You will walk away from this show feeling like you took a trip to your country of origin, or you dropped into a family dinner.

Zacharopoulo’ writing and material had depth, and the humour was witty and perceptive; this combined with his relaxed presence on stage, made for a comfortable and amusing evening that reminded me greatly of the enjoyment I feel when watching My Big Fat Greek Wedding.

George Zacharopoulos, if you are reading this, I was the Lebanese reviewer in the front row at one of your last shows at the Austral. I have been harping on about your show ever since, and I will be advocating for people to see you perform on your return to Adelaide next year!

4.5 stars


Words by Michelle Wakim